Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Sand Phlox, Cleft Phlox

Frequent in the western part of the Kankakee region of northern Indiana (also on dry sandstone further south), Phlox bifida has a special affinity for dry, stable sandy slopes, especially the hottest ones facing south or west.
Countless thousands of these were flowering in Newton County today. Photographed in Black Oak savanna at Indiana's only ghost town (Conrad) in the Conrad Savanna Nature Preserve.
I have lots of pictures of this plant already, but how could I pass up another chance? Photographed April 4th, 2012.

7 comments:

A.L. Gibson said...

Ah, I'm jealous this doesn't make it far east enough to exist in Ohio. Although, if it did I would suspect the sandy oak savannahs of the oak openings region in the NW would be its best bet. Absolutely gorgeous species I'd love to see and photograph someday.

Justin R. Thomas said...

Keith, your photography has always been exceptional, but these photos and the photos of Viola pedata are absolutely phenomenal. Have you added a new toy or are you just getting that much better at the craft?

dwhr said...
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dwhr said...

Very nice shot! I'd better get moving that way soon if I want to see it and Viola pedata in bloom. Also, this form looks slightly lavender, and I've only really seen from this species in white. Do the plants at Conrad Station have forms with more variable coloration? Thanks again.

Keith Board said...

Thanks Justin and dwhr for the compliments! Yes, I have a new DSLR; the first pictures posted from it were of Viola pedata. Nice that you noticed an improvement!!!

Nearly all of the Phlox bifida plants that I saw were white-flowered, but here and there some were pink and some were lavender colored.

Scott Namestnik said...

I agree. Amazing photos, as always, Keith!

Keith Board said...

Thanks Scott. And thanks again for helping me see the benefits of digital photography. I never want to deal with camera film again!